Monday, May 5, 2014

Where's the LCS?

ComNavOps generally refrains from simply repeating articles posted elsewhere unless some analysis and value can be added.  However, Defense News website has an article (1) that should be noted and I have no additional analysis to add.  The article says it all.

To summarize what they wrote, RIMPAC, the world’s largest international naval exercise, is held every other year and the next iteration will be this summer at Pearl Harbor.  No LCS is scheduled to participate.  This is another in an endless series of truly baffling decisions associated with this program.  Wouldn’t you think that a program that is fighting as much bad press as this one would seize every opportunity for some good public relations, favorable press, and real world exposure and operating experience?  And yet, despite having four vessels in commission, none can be made available to attend.  The LCS is being justified, in large measure, as a key to the Pacific Pivot strategy.  What better opportunity is there to interact with the various Pacific actors than RIMPAC?

Whether you support the LCS or not, this is clearly a golden opportunity for the program and it’s being squandered.

Of course, the cynical might wonder if the Navy hasn’t already recognized that the LCS isn’t really capable of contributing to these types of operations and would, in reality, turn out to be a negative PR exercise. 

Please read the article linked below.  Again, my apologies for having little to contribute on this one but it was noteworthy enough to point out.


  

4 comments:

  1. The Navy doesn't want to reveal it's secret weapons systems. Turbolasers, photon torpedos, death rays, just add water dehydrated Superman...

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  2. One only needs to review Freedoms last disastrous trip across the big pond. She was laid up in Singapore most of the time. Considering her only worthwhile accomplishment was the deliver of a whopping 2 pallets of aid during the Philippines Typhoon, she provide virtually NO VALUE for her cost both to build and to operate. Quick cost review....
    Add the fuel and operating cost to cross the Pacific twice to the cost of repairs by civilians OCONUS and docking fees in Singapore.
    Divide this number by 100 (2 pallets of rice, fifty sacks each) for disaster relief and we will see that each sack of rice cost the Navy more than 20 grand to deliver. Who really needs disaster relief???
    Now that's efficiency.

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  3. Now that's a rice burner.

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  4. I remember someone saying "Instead of saying 'where's the carriers' they'll say 'Where's the LCS' "

    Maybe this is what they meant?

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